Monday: A Song of Solomon

Theme: Christ the King

In this week’s lessons we see how this psalm ultimately points to the kingdom of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Scripture: Psalm 72:1-20

However, it is not as a psalm of Solomon that this poem has commended itself so deeply to the synagogue and church. It is because it portrays the ideal king, and in the minds of Christian people this ideal king has always rightly been understood to be the Lord Jesus Christ. 

Think and Act Biblically from James Boice is a devotional of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. It is supported only by its readers and gracious Christians like you. Please prayerfully consider supporting Think and Act Biblically and the mission of the Alliance.

The Trickle Down Effect

On the gulf between the academy and the church and where women participate.

 
I had the pleasure of being treated to lunch yesterday by a friend I haven’t seen in three years. We were struggling in one sense, as we wanted to hear about each other’s family, but had limited time and the conversation quickly steered to theological discoveries, which provoked more questions. My friend just completed seminary and is now diving deeper into Greek and Hebrew languages.  She mentioned how she longed to see more women encouraged to go to seminary and learn at that level.

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Friday: A Psalm for Old Age

Theme: Bearing Witness to God in the Present

In this week’s lessons we are reminded that God has demonstrated his faithfulness in the past, and can be counted on in the future.

Scripture: Psalm 71:1-24

Looking first back and then ahead, brings us to the present, the third way in which David deals with the limitations of old age. He looks to the past to remind himself of God's faithfulness and power. He looks to the future to remind himself of the work yet to be done. Then, having done both of those things, he turns to the present and begins to do exactly what he has been talking about. He bears witness to God now. What he praises God for chiefly is his righteousness (vv. 19-21) and faithfulness (vv. 22-24).

Think and Act Biblically from James Boice is a devotional of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. It is supported only by its readers and gracious Christians like you. Please prayerfully consider supporting Think and Act Biblically and the mission of the Alliance.

The Intentionally Welcoming Church

“I don’t remember if we’ve met before…” is a far more welcoming greeting than ignoring a person altogether. I have yet to hear anyone tell me they were greeted by too many church members on a Sunday morning when they visited a new church. Large or small, every church can implement some practical steps to make sure visitors know they are welcome...A short, awkward conversation is far more endearing than a cold shoulder.

Small or large, every church has the important responsibility of receiving visitors. When someone visits your church for the first time, what is their experience? Welcoming visitors is rarely discussed, and very few churches have plans in place to make sure it happens, but it is a deficiency worthy of a remedy.

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Thursday: A Psalm for Old Age

Theme: There Is Still Work to Do

In this week’s lessons we are reminded that God has demonstrated his faithfulness in the past, and can be counted on in the future.

Scripture: Psalm 71:1-24

I suppose there are some people who in their old age only look back to the past and are often quite unhappy as they do. They think of what they have had and lost or what they wish they could have had and never did. The present does not mean much to them except as a basis for complaining about their multiplying aches and pains, and they are afraid to look forward. They are afraid of dying. David's approach to old age was not like this.

Think and Act Biblically from James Boice is a devotional of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. It is supported only by its readers and gracious Christians like you. Please prayerfully consider supporting Think and Act Biblically and the mission of the Alliance.

Wednesday: A Psalm for Old Age

Theme: A Good Gift

In this week’s lessons we are reminded that God has demonstrated his faithfulness in the past, and can be counted on in the future.

Scripture: Psalm 71:1-24

This leads us to the second important element of this psalm. For the reflections David gives us concerning old age are not so we will wring our hands and complain about how bad it is to grow old, but the contrary. David wants us to see that even old age is given to us by God, and therefore is one of his good gifts that should be used for his glory and the blessing and well-being of others.

Think and Act Biblically from James Boice is a devotional of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. It is supported only by its readers and gracious Christians like you. Please prayerfully consider supporting Think and Act Biblically and the mission of the Alliance.

Tuesday: A Psalm for Old Age

Theme: Some Universal Problems

In this week’s lessons we are reminded that God has demonstrated his faithfulness in the past, and can be counted on in the future.

Scripture: Psalm 71:1-24

It is not fun to be old, especially in America. At other times and in other cultures old age had advantages to offset its disadvantages. Elderly persons were honored and respected. Their wisdom was valued. That is no longer true in America or in the West generally. Here we value youth, and the culture is so oriented to youthful interests that many old people even try to dress and act like teenagers. David didn't have those problems, of course. But the problems he had as a result of his old age were serious and even universal. In fact, they are the most basic problems of all.

Think and Act Biblically from James Boice is a devotional of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. It is supported only by its readers and gracious Christians like you. Please prayerfully consider supporting Think and Act Biblically and the mission of the Alliance.

Monday: A Psalm for Old Age

Theme: A Song of Old Age

In this week’s lessons we are reminded that God has demonstrated his faithfulness in the past, and can be counted on in the future.

Scripture: Psalm 71:1-24

Almost all the psalms in the second book of the Psalter have title lines, with the exception of this psalm. In fact, the only other example is Psalm 43, which seems to belong with Psalm 42, which was why those two psalms were treated together in our study. Since Psalm 71 likewise has no title line, some commentators think it might originally have belonged with Psalm 70, both therefore being ascribed to King David.

Think and Act Biblically from James Boice is a devotional of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. It is supported only by its readers and gracious Christians like you. Please prayerfully consider supporting Think and Act Biblically and the mission of the Alliance.

Friday: Let God Be Exalted

Theme: Crying Out in Faith

In this week’s lessons the psalmist teaches us to pray in desperate circumstances.

Scripture: Psalm 70:1-5

The last verse of Psalm 70 is what I call the psalmist's most basic beliefs or persuasion. It has two parts: 1) that he is "poor and needy"; and 2) that God is his "help and deliverer.”

The last verse of Psalm 70 is what I call the psalmist's most basic beliefs or persuasion. It has two parts: 1) that he is "poor and needy"; and 2) that God is his "help and deliverer.”

Think and Act Biblically from James Boice is a devotional of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. It is supported only by its readers and gracious Christians like you. Please prayerfully consider supporting Think and Act Biblically and the mission of the Alliance.

Thursday: Let God Be Exalted

Theme: Using Our Trials to Pray for Others

In this week’s lessons the psalmist teaches us to pray in desperate circumstances.

Scripture: Psalm 70:1-5

Yesterday we looked at the first two of David’s prayers in Psalm 70. The first was for himself (that he might experience a quick deliverance). And the second was for his enemies (that they might be ashamed and confused). Today we'll look at the third prayer.

Yesterday we looked at the first two of David’s prayers in Psalm 70. The first was for himself (that he might experience a quick deliverance). And the second was for his enemies (that they might be ashamed and confused). Today we'll look at the third prayer.

Think and Act Biblically from James Boice is a devotional of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. It is supported only by its readers and gracious Christians like you. Please prayerfully consider supporting Think and Act Biblically and the mission of the Alliance.

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