August 2014

Total Depravity 27

Jude explained the true nature of fallen man through his brief epistle. He used several metaphorical descriptions to define the true nature of an apostate, or false believer.

He identified them as ungodly. “For certain people have crept in unnoticed who long ago were designated for this condemnation, ungodly people, who pervert the grace of our God into sensuality and deny our only Master and Lord, Jesus Christ” (Jude 1:4 ESV).

Jude explained the true nature of fallen man through his brief epistle. He used several metaphorical descriptions to define the true nature of an apostate, or false believer.

He identified them as ungodly. “For certain people have crept in unnoticed who long ago were designated for this condemnation, ungodly people, who pervert the grace of our God into sensuality and deny our only Master and Lord, Jesus Christ” (Jude 1:4 ESV).

He reiterated this truth in vs. 14-16.

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In his epistles, John the Apostle continued what he previously documented in his gospel. To begin with, John explained that sinners exist in spiritual darkness. “This is the message we have heard from him and proclaim to you, that God is light, and in him is no darkness at all. If we say we have fellowship with him while we walk in darkness, we lie and do not practice the truth” (1 John 1:5-6 ESV).

In his epistles, John the Apostle continued what he previously documented in his gospel. To begin with, John explained that sinners exist in spiritual darkness. “This is the message we have heard from him and proclaim to you, that God is light, and in him is no darkness at all. If we say we have fellowship with him while we walk in darkness, we lie and do not practice the truth” (1 John 1:5-6 ESV).

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James said a lot about the fallen nature and condition of man before God. He began with an explanation about the reality and pattern of temptations and sinful choices.

Let no one say when he is tempted, “I am being tempted by God,” for God cannot be tempted with evil, and he himself tempts no one. But each person is tempted when he is lured and enticed by his own desire. Then desire when it has conceived gives birth to sin, and sin when it is fully grown brings forth death. (James 1:13-15 ESV)

James said a lot about the fallen nature and condition of man before God. He began with an explanation about the reality and pattern of temptations and sinful choices.

Let no one say when he is tempted, “I am being tempted by God,” for God cannot be tempted with evil, and he himself tempts no one. But each person is tempted when he is lured and enticed by his own desire. Then desire when it has conceived gives birth to sin, and sin when it is fully grown brings forth death. (James 1:13-15 ESV)

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The remaining New Testament Epistles effectively present the doctrine of radical depravity in fallen and sinful man. The Book of Hebrews, along with the epistles by James, John, and Jude, all contribute to the argument that sin has totally affected sinners in their intellect, emotions and will.

The remaining New Testament Epistles effectively present the doctrine of radical depravity in fallen and sinful man. The Book of Hebrews, along with the epistles by James, John, and Jude, all contribute to the argument that sin has totally affected sinners in their intellect, emotions and will.

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In Paul’s three Pastoral Epistles, he clearly presented the doctrine of radical depravity.

Paul explained that the unconverted fail to see themselves as the sinners they truly are.

Now we know that the law is good, if one uses it lawfully, understanding this, that the law is not laid down for the just but for the lawless and disobedient, for the ungodly and sinners, for the unholy and profane, for those who strike their fathers and mothers, for murderers, the sexually immoral, men who practice homosexuality, enslavers, liars, perjurers, and whatever else is contrary to sound doctrine, in accordance with the gospel of the glory of the blessed God with which I have been entrusted. (1Timothy 1:8-11 ESV)

In Paul’s three Pastoral Epistles, he clearly presented the doctrine of radical depravity.

Paul explained that the unconverted fail to see themselves as the sinners they truly are.

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Paul continued this examination of radical depravity in the epistles to the churches in Ephesus, and Thessalonica.

In Ephesians 4:17-19, Paul indicated that all unbelievers live in a condition of spiritual darkness.

Now this I say and testify in the Lord, that you must no longer walk as the Gentiles do, in the futility of their minds. They are darkened in their understanding, alienated from the life of God because of the ignorance that is in them, due to their hardness of heart. They have become callous and have given themselves up to sensuality, greedy to practice every kind of impurity. (Ephesians 4:17-19, ESV)

Paul continued this examination of radical depravity in the epistles to the churches in Ephesus, and Thessalonica.

In Ephesians 4:17-19, Paul indicated that all unbelievers live in a condition of spiritual darkness.

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The same theme of radical depravity is not only conspicuous in the Book of Romans, but continues to be seen in Paul’s two epistles of the Corinthians along with his letter to the churches located in the region known as Galatia.

I Corinthians immediately begins with an extended treatise by the apostle on man’s fallen nature.

The same theme of radical depravity is not only conspicuous in the Book of Romans, but continues to be seen in Paul’s two epistles of the Corinthians along with his letter to the churches located in the region known as Galatia.

I Corinthians immediately begins with an extended treatise by the apostle on man’s fallen nature.

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Unquestionably, the Apostle Peter accurately denoted the sinful condition of fallen man in the Scriptures. However, so too did the Apostle Paul.

Paul’s Epistle to the Romans is a hallmark by the apostle concerning the sovereign grace of God and the radical depravity of man. Within the epistle are the following characteristics of man’s total depravity.

Unquestionably, the Apostle Peter accurately denoted the sinful condition of fallen man in the Scriptures. However, so too did the Apostle Paul.

Paul’s Epistle to the Romans is a hallmark by the apostle concerning the sovereign grace of God and the radical depravity of man. Within the epistle are the following characteristics of man’s total depravity.

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The Apostle Peter clearly acknowledged the culture of corruption that man encounters originates within himself. Sinful man must lay the blame for all the evil in the world to the source of that evil: his fallen and sinful soul.

Peter wrote that all people, including believers prior to their salvation, were engulfed in spiritual darkness. “But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light. Once you were not a people, but now you are God's people; once you had not received mercy, but now you have received mercy” (1 Peter 2:9-10, ESV).

The Apostle Peter clearly acknowledged the culture of corruption that man encounters originates within himself. Sinful man must lay the blame for all the evil in the world to the source of that evil: his fallen and sinful soul.

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The Acts of the Apostles also depicts the radical depravity of man in the church’s formative years. The early church’s birth and infancy recognizes the core need of salvation from man’s core problem: his sinful nature. Luke’s portrayal of this condition is found in two of Peter’s sermons.

The Acts of the Apostles also depicts the radical depravity of man in the church’s formative years. The early church’s birth and infancy recognizes the core need of salvation from man’s core problem: his sinful nature. Luke’s portrayal of this condition is found in two of Peter’s sermons.

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